The Guitar Hero Freaks:
Daniel Lee
Jesse Giles
Tony Serna
Zeb Hornbuckle

Two tribes:
  1. Clallam
  2. Nez Perce


Clallam Coastal tribe
Needs
  • Food
  • Clothing
  • Shelter
Wants
  • Woodworking

Food
The Clallam tribe hunted and fished for the food they needed. In the summer season, they fished mainly for salmon, the most prioritized trait of their culture. Salmon was very important because the fish provided food, oil and bone tools. Salmon was very abundant in rivers streams and lakes. Fishermen utilized spears, nets, traps, weirs and fences. They also caught other animals from the sea and lakes, including: cod, herring, trout, halibut and shellfish. In the winter season, the hunters went out to hunt various game, such as deer, elk, bears and other smaller game. Hunters used spears, bows, clubs and traps to catch/ hunt the meat they needed. When the game was caught, the meat was either boiled, roasted or steam baked. Cooks also smoked the meat into jerky for later use.

Clothing
Clallam women made clothes from warm yellow cedar bark. They made skirts, shawls, and robes from the sturdy bark material. The bark was useful, due to the fact that the bark carried a layer of oil, which caused the clothing to easily shed water. Seamstresses also lined the clothes with down and/or fur.

Shelter
In order for the people to adapt to the climate, they built different shelters that well fit their environment. In the summer season, temporary lodges of bushes and bark were built. Due to the mild climate, little shelter was needed during the warm summers. However, the winter season brought forth much more tempestuous living conditions, dark snow storms, cold temperatures and constant rain. To survive in the dismal winter season, the people (including men and women) built permanent longhouses of cedar bark. The lengths of these grand shelters ranged from 40 to 100 feet and the widths varied from 14 to 20 feet. Due to the immense size of the houses, several families could live in one longhouse. Inside the longhouses, bunks lined the walls and several fires marked the place of each family. The roof slats could be opened to let out cooking smoke from the fire. The villages of the longhouses were always situated near rivers and/or streams. The families of the longhouse set up totem poles to distinguish each longhouse and to display their family's background. The only openings of the shelters were the doors at the end of the house.

Woodworking
Men of the Clallam tribe became woodworkers to satisfy various wants of the people. Basic and common tools included: serving trays and ladles. Serving trays were made in various sizes, small trays were used by families or individuals to serve/eat food. Large trays were usually used at large feasts, dances, potlatches and festivals. Vast mounds of food, decorations and clothing were piled onto the serving trays. Woodworkers also made everything else of wood when needed.


Nez Perce Plateau Tribe
Needs

  • Food
  • Clothing
  • Shelter
Wants
  • Bartering Goods

Food
Fishermen and hunters of the tribe provided sockeye salmon, deer, bear, elk, buffalo, birds, rabbits, mountain goats, sheep, and beavers. The meat that the hunters and fishermen provided food for later and current use. In times of scarcity of food, the men provided dogs, horses, snakes, grasshoppers, crickets, blackberries, huckleberries, chokeberries, sunflower seeds, camas bulbs and bitterroots. The various supplies of food well met their needs.

Clothing
The Nez Perce people had to adapt to their climate and environment with the right clothing needs. In the summer, the men wore breechcloths, leggings and moccasins. Because of the warm, pleasant summer season, the men didnt need much clothing. The females of the tribe wore decorative dresses made of animal skins, woven grass, and/or dog hair. In the cruel winter conditions, all of the Nez Perce people wore heavy, warm clothing made of animal skins and fur pelts. Ceremonial headdresses were made of feathers and animal skins and were worn during special ceremonies and dances.

Shelter
Throughout the year, the Nez Perce builders made wigwams of spruce poles cut at about 5 to 10 feet heights. The poles were arranged into cones and tied at the top. Finally, the builders gathered birch bark and sewed the bark onto the cone.

Bartering Goods
The Nez Perce people loved to barter and trade goods with each other and various fur traders from foreign lands. The tribe members mainly traded horses and various services. The traders and service workers were very skilled and were successful in the transactions. Women made utensils, ornaments and clothing for trade. The Nez Perce were also well known for their leather goods.


Bibliography
Clallam:

http://www.jamestowntribe.org/jstweb_2007/history/hist_weaving.htm
http://www.jamestowntribe.org/jstweb_2007/history/hist_women.htm
http://www.jamestowntribe.org/jstweb_2007/history/hist_women.htm
http://www.jamestowntribe.org/jstweb_2007/history/hist_homes.htm
http://www.jamestowntribe.org/jstweb_2007/history/hist_men.htm
Nez Perce:
Washington, A State of Contrasts
, by Dale A. Lambert

Pictures:
http://content.lib.washington.edu/cgi-bin/htmlview.exe?CISOROOT=/loc&CISOPTR=2068 (clallam people by a canoe)
http://content.lib.washington.edu/cgi-bin/htmlview.exe?CISOROOT=/loc&CISOPTR=101 (two clallam children)
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:Nez-perce-couple-teepee-1900.jpg#filehistory (a nez perce couple by their tipi)
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:Nez_Perce_warrior_on_horse.jpg (nez perce warrior on horse)